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Nadezhda Rumyantseva (aka Rumiantseva). Nadezhda Rumyantseva, a Russian comedienne and character actress in Soviet comedies.

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Nadezhda Rumyantseva

Nadezhda Vasilyevna Rumyantseva is a Soviet/Russian theatrical and cinema actress greatly popular in the Soviet Union. Rumyantseva is most famous for her comic and character roles and voicing a lot of Soviet cartoons.

Nadezhda Rumyantseva roles in "Devchata" (Girls) (1961) and "Koroleva benzokolonki" (Queen of the Gas Station) (1963) made Western Media compare her with Lucille Ball. Yet she managed to create a unique image of an honest, merry and proud after-the-war girl who could cope all the hardships with her jolly nature and never gave up. Quotes of Rumyantseva's heroines still make a part of Russian humor.

Nadezhda Rumyantseva was born on September 9, 1930, in Potapovo village, Smolensk province, Soviet Union. She was nicknamed an "actress" for her artistic nature often taking part in concerts and singing in choir.

She first acted on the stage, at Moscow's Central Children's Theater, when she was a teenager in the 1940s. She made her film debut at 22 in "Navstrechu zhizni" (Encountering Life).

Rumyantseva studied acting at the Soviet State Institute of Cinema (VGIK), graduating in 1952 as an actress. Her small height at once determined her type as a travesty. She looked very youthful for long time and film directors chose her for character roles in Soviet comedies.

Her years of great popularity in the USSR came in the late 1950s to the mid-60s, when she starred in a series of teen-age family comedies, "Nepoddajushchiesya" (The Unamenables -1959), "Devchata" (Girls - 1961), "Koroleva benzokolonki" (Queen of the Gas Station - 1963), etc., in a couple of which her romantic-comic partner was played by Yuri Belov.

She also dubbed Natalya Varley in a Russian comedy "Kavkazskaya Plennitsa" (Kidnapped in Caucasian style)(1967), and Audrey Hepburn in a Russian adaptation of "How to Steal a Million" (1966) for the Soviet market.

Since 1955 she worked at the State Theater of the Movie Actor.

Nadezhda Rumyantseva was married to a Soviet diplomat, Villi Khshtoyan. In the 60s and 70s, Rumyantseva was living outside the Soviet Union, due to the nature of her husband's job. She temporarily left her career on TV and at the theater to stay with her husband.

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Back in Moscow Rumyantseva was working on TV hosting a Soviet TV show for children "Budilnik" (The alarm clock) and occasionally dubbed voices for Russian animated cartoons. She was a brilliant voice actress. She voiced all female characters of American television serial drama "Twin Pix", highly popular in the Soviet Union that time and the female lead of "Slave Isaura" soap opera. A monkey from the favourite Russian cartoon "38 parrots" was also voiced by Rumyantseva as well.

In 1996 she was attacked by two burglars in her Moscow apartment. One of the burglars hit Rumyantseva in the head, causing her a severe head trauma, and she suffered from headaches for the rest of her life. Rumyantseva and her husband moved to the Moscow suburbs where Nadezhda Vasilyevna lived quietly avoiding high life and meeting journalists. She died of a brain cancer on April 8, 2008, in a Moscow clinic, and was laid to rest in Armyanskoye Cemetery in Moscow, Russia.

Nadezhda Rumyantseva was titled a People's Artist of Russian Federation (1991), Honored Artist of Russia (1963) and awarded an Order of Honour of Russian Federation (2002).


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